Continuing Education Courses

Summer 2018 Online courses for credit only

303 Christian Theology in Reformed Confessions (3 credits)

Introduces Reformed theology through a study of confessions, from the Reformation era (Belgic Confession, Heidelberg Catechism, Canons of Dort) and the more recent past (Contemporary Testimony, Belhar Confession), and through the basic elements of the Reformed worldview grounded in this confessional theology.

  Timothy Howerzyl; online

564 Intersections of Theology and Science (2 credits)

Examines the theological topics of creation and humanity with an emphasis on how they intersect with modern scientific concerns and considers implications of these intersections for ministry.

  Scott Hoezee; online

716 Bible Survey (3 credits)

Prepares leaders in the church to be faithful and effective stewards of the Word by acquainting them with the basic content and principal theme of each book of the Bible; the historical, geographical, and cultural backgrounds to the Bible; its introductory hermeneutical principles; and its continuing relevance.

  Josephy Hwang; online

718 Christian Engagement with World Religions (3 credits)

Introduces the global engagement of the Christian faith with major world religions, worldviews, and forms of spirituality, framed by a biblical-Reformed theology and philosophy of religion that examines religious experience, tradition and practice in the light of general and scriptural revelation, and a commitment to the universal common humanity of God’s image bearers.

  Gayle Doornbos; online

773 CRC Polity (1.5 credits)

Prepares students for effective leadership and ministry in the CRC by introducing principles and structures of CRC polity and exploring case studies in church governance and administration, with reference to Church Order and the Synodical Regulations.

  Kathy Smith; online

774 CRC History (1.5 credits)

An intro to the basic outline of CRC History and some key ethical and theological positions of the CRC. The course focuses on the key elements of CRC identity in North America, including the struggle for liberty, Christian education, and tensions about Americanization-that are essential knowledge for effective ministry in the CRC.

  Gayle Doornbos; online

 

Fall 2018 Online courses for credit only

588 The Uneasy Legacy of Protestant Political Theology* (2-3 credits)

Why has Christian theology so often been used to justify oppression? How has our political theology both strengthened and undermined our Christian witness? How has it been shaped and distorted by various social contexts? In this seminar we will explore the uneasy legacy of Protestant political theology by exploring its role in key moments of social and political crisis ranging from colonialism to slavery, from the civil rights movement to the culture wars.

  Matthew Tuininga; online

641 Contemporary Youth Culture and Intergenerational Ministry* (2 credits)

Examines cultural institutions affecting youth, analyzes current understandings of family, media, school, and peer relationships among adolescents, and teaches how to plan and conduct intergenerational learning, serving, and high adventure activities that promote responsible interaction and spiritual growth.

  Robert Keeley; online

311 Introduction to Missional Ministry* (2 credits)

Introduces aspects of pastoral ministry for a missional congregation.

  Cory Willson; online

715 Digital Bible Tools (1 credit)

This course introduces students to using digital tools for studying Scripture: exploring the text in its original languages, finding resources for deeper enrichment, and establishing a lifelong process for preparing to teach and preach.

  Sarah Schreiber and Nathan Bierma; online

*this course requires attendance at class sessions in Grand Rapids the week of October 10-15.

 

Fall 2018 in residence for credit or as a visitor

303 Christian Theology in Reformed Confessions (3 credits)

Introduces Reformed theology through a study of confessions, from the Reformation era (Belgic Confession, Heidelberg Catechism, Canons of Dort) and the more recent past (Contemporary Testimony, Belhar Confession), and through the basic elements of the Reformed worldview grounded in this confessional theology.

  Jessica Maddox; Tues and Thurs 9:30-10:45AM, Room 140

463 Shalom:  Its Meaning and Significance (2-3 credits)

Provides the vision and understanding of God’s plan for creation to inspire lifestyles and ministries that conform to God´s good will for the cosmos, society, the Church, and for each person. Learning and theological reflection is done regarding sites where significant models of community transformation, social justice and care for creation are being developed in the US, Canada, and other countries.

  Mariano Avila; Wed 1:30-3:00PM, Room 140

507 Isaiah (2-3 credits)

An exegetical study of selected passages from the Prophecy of Isaiah in the Hebrew text, including syntactical, form critical, prosodic, hermeneutical, and biblical-theological issues. The course will offer M.Div. students an opportunity to apply their knowledge of the original languages and understanding of biblical hermeneutics to the challenging task of communicating the message of Isaiah in an effective way.

  Amanda Benckhuysen; Tues 1:30-3:00PM, Room 140

562 Doctrine and Practice of Infant Baptism (2-3 credits)

Studies the biblical basis, historical development, systematic formulation, major criticisms, and liturgical shape of the doctrine of infant baptism, with special focus on the Reformed tradition.

  Lyle Bierma; Thurs 1:30-3:00PM, Room 142

610 Preaching without Notes and Other Fun Challenges (2-3 credits)

In this course, students will use skills from improv and oral communication to develop their confidence and comfort while speaking before groups of people, will write new sermons and deliver them without notes, and learn how to listen well to other preachers and give helpful feedback.

  Mary Hulst; Tues 3:30-5:15PM; Room 152

670 The Making of Global Christianity (2-3 credits)

Knowledge of the Christian tradition involves knowledge of the diversity within Global Christianity today. This course aims to expose students to the contemporary landscape of World Christianity. Special emphasis will be given to rapid growth of Christianity in the Global South over the last century and to the dynamics of cross-cultural transmission of the faith.

  Albert Strydhorst; Mon 1:30-3:15PM, Room 142

683 Human Suffering and Pastoral Care (2-3 credits)

Engages the spiritual struggle to embrace the realities of human suffering and the loving nature of God through a variety of theological perspectives from classical and popular texts.

  Danjuma Gibson; Thurs 1:30-3:15PM, Room 141

773 CRC Polity (1.5 credits)

Prepares students for effective leadership and ministry in the CRC by introducing principles and structures of CRC polity and exploring case studies in church governance and administration, with reference to Church Order and the Synodical Regulations.

  Kathy Smith; Tues and Thurs 8:00-9:15AM, Room 141, First Half of the Semester

774 CRC History (1.5 credits)

An intro to the basic outline of CRC History and some key ethical and theological positions of the CRC. The course focuses on the key elements of CRC identity in North America, including the struggle for liberty, Christian education, and tensions about Americanization-that are essential knowledge for effective ministry in the CRC.

  Lyle Bierma; Tues and Thurs 8:00-9:15AM, Room 141, Second Half of the Semester

854 Jonathan Edwards and C.S. Lewis (2-3 credits)

This course will be a comparison of two leading British apologists and theologians who lived two centuries apart. The course will consider the biographical backgrounds of each and their differing historical and ecclesiastical settings and the intellectual, cultural, and theological challenges that each of them faced. Emphasis will be place on understanding the views of each, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses, and reflecting on the usefulness of their outlooks in differing cultural settings today. The course will be based on readings and discussions of both primary and secondary sources.

  George Marsden; Mon 1:30-4:00PM, Room 140

 

Please note:

You may take courses at Calvin Seminary either as a non-degree student or as a community auditor.

  • Non-degree students complete all assignments, receive feedback from the professor, and receive graduate-level credit.
  • Community auditors attend all class meetings, but do not have required assignments, receive grades, or receive graduate-level credit.