Editorials

  • A Short History of Kerux November 21, 2014 The Kerux is a Calvin Theological Seminary student publication that has served a variety of purposes over the years including being a place for news, opinions, interviews, announcements, prayer requests, and classifieds. Kerux has been regularly published since 1965 (based on the current volume number). At times, Kerux was a bi-weekly publication but in recent years it has often been a monthly publication. During the 2006-2007 school year the editorial staff decided that Kerux would be published primarily online. Since that time, it has occasionally been primarily online, while at other times in print as well, depending on the team of editors. Currently volumes 32 (1998) through 49 (current) can be found and read online (see the side bar if you are interested). Kerux has ranged from a two page publication to at least twenty pages at times and has had various formats over the years. This year during the first CTS Student Senate meeting the idea of discontinuing this publication was seriously considered due to Senate discussions surrounding its purpose due to E-news and the CTS website taking over some of the prior roles of the Kerux in bringing news, and delay in finding enough editors. Due to these conversations and initial uncertainty concerning who the editorial staff would be this year, this initial publication was significantly delayed. After some discussion it was decided that as the only student run-publication, Kerux has played an important role in the past and still has a role to play in CTS student life as the primary voice of the student body. The editors this year include Monica Brands and three Student Senators, Ronald Hunsucker, Bob VanLonkhuyzen, and Robert Van Zanen. While continuing the many positive traditions of The Kerux, we also hope to bring some focus on the CTS community to elicit greater ...
  • New Student Senate Social Media November 12, 2014 Don’t forget to check out the new CTS Student Senate Facebook page as well as their recently created Twitter feed (CTSSemSenate). Follow them on the bottom right-hand side of this page.
  • New Kerux Edition Next Week! November 10, 2014 Keep your eyes open for the Kerux appearing on a Student Center table near you. Don’t forget to bookmark this website so as to stay updated on all of the Kerux’s articles and discussions.
  • “Global Conversations” – Imbalanced November 19, 2013 “Global Conversations” – Imbalanced A few weeks ago we hauled a piano into our house.  There were five of us – two on one end and three on the other. Imagine a sixth guy joining the three – and then another, and another, until finally there were six guys on one end and two on the other. What does imbalance look like? 60% of all Christians live in the global South (we used to talk of this as the 3rd world), but they hold only 17% of all Christian financial resources The top 10 missionary-sending countries are home to only 32% of the world’s church members, but they send almost 73% of all missionaries 73% of all non-Christians live in 10 countries, but these countries receive only 9% of all missionaries* Each one of these points could be pressed and prodded.  I suspect there’s a relationship between the first two – it takes money, after all, to send missionaries internationally.  And the third begs the explanation that some of these ten countries deny missionary access.  And so on.  Disparity can be explained. But if only 9% of all international missionaries are going into the least-reached countries, where are the rest going?  Here’s the reality: Most missionaries go to mostly-Christian countries. Some really smart folks with the Southern Baptists, the Joshua Project, and even Gordon Conwell Seminary have invested good parts of their lives trying to figure out how many unbelievers and unreached people there are, exactly.  The unreached are not unbelievers who’ve rejected the gospel – they’re unreached, they haven’t ever heard.  The math can get quite fuzzy.  The Baptists find the most at almost 4 billion; others find anywhere down to 2 billion.  However you slice, dice, or define it, we’re talking about a lot of unreached people.  They haven’t rejected the gospel – they’ve never heard ...
  • Global Conversations – “Very” October 2, 2013 The Kerux is very excited to announce that Albert Strydhorst has offered to submit a regular column about global ministry entitled “Global Conversations.” Very At one point in the June 2013 Synod, Rev. Joel Boot, the Executive Director of the CRCNA, was asked, “How significant is it in our ecumenical relations that the head of the CRC is ordained?”  After a brief pause, Boot replied, “Very.” Which got me thinking, “How significant are our ecumenical relations in any decision we make at Synod?”  Does it matter what our ecumenical partners think about what we think about? The CRC has “ecclesiastical fellowship” with 21 churches around the world – 14 from the global south (pejoratively, the “developing world” – largely Africa, Latin America, much of Asia) and 7 from the north (“developed world”). We’re in formal “dialogue” with 12 others, 10 of whom are southern.  We’re also part of the 260-member World Communion of Reformed Churches, 185 from the global south and 75 from the north.  Southern Christianity increasingly carries the numerical weight and vitality of the faith.  To recall Prof. Lamin Sanneh’s provocative title, “Whose Religion is Christianity?” I realize we don’t have the kind of accountability among Reformed churches that, say, the Catholics have – or even the Anglicans.  When the Pope speaks it’s for Catholics around the world; lesser, the Archbishop of Canterbury for Anglicans.  But they also need to pay attention to their flock around the world.  Just ask the Anglicans what it means when church membership from the global south carries the numerical weight in the global Communion, and they’ll probably tell you about Lambeth 1998 and its resolution against homosexual conduct – much to the chagrin (“sputtering rage”) of many northern bishops. The CRC would do well to hear from our southern partners on issues considered at Synod this year.  Unfortunately ...
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