Editorials

  • The Word of Our Testimony by R.R. Tavárez May 31, 2016 It has been a distinct pleasure to serve the Kerux this academic year. This year I joined the editing team as the Formatting Specialist. The what? Basically, I am the person in charge of the photos, graphics and the artistic direction of this magazine. One of our goals this year has been to put an attractive, quality product in your hands. I do not often get the opportunity to put my marketing background to good use. But with the Kerux I have found a meaningful way to share my gifts with you. I hope you have enjoyed the new look and feel of the Kerux that has been developed this year. This year each volume of the Kerux has had a theme. The theme of this volume is “Testimony.” When Christians talk about testimonies, it commonly involves stories related to becoming a believer in Jesus Christ. When I think of testimonies I cannot help but think of a visit I made to a “holiness church” several years ago. At the time, this church still exercised an old-school practice—testimony service. Essentially, there was an open mic set up in the sanctuary before the formal Sunday worship would take place. It was at this time that the saints of the church were welcome to come to the mic and share whatever testimony the Holy Spirit laid on their hearts to share. There were heard testimonies of God’s faithfulness to the saints in all sorts of circumstances—the good, the bad and the ugly. With each testimony, the speaker praised God and encouraged the gathered to trust in the Lord, no matter what they were going through. This volume collects both conversion stories and encouragement. Every testimony of God’s work in our lives is unique. The Holy Spirit is active, reaching us in the mysterious ways, ...
  • Gospel Transformation: Editors Desk by Ronald Hunsucker December 9, 2015 What are the social implications of the gospel? This was the question that initially prompted our work on the November/December edition of the Kerux. The writers present a message that is rooted in the vision of never settling for what has been done. In ministry there is always progress to be made. If no one believes this, wait until the sermon evaluations are handed back from Mentored Ministries with suggestions for progress and improvement! Ministers and mentors can testify to the difficult work involved in living out the gospel. Questions about the relationship between social ethics and the gospel are particularly pressing in our country today, as social injustices within and outside the church are more and more coming to the foreground. Many of these injustices the church has played a role in. In this context, it is vital for us to be able to offer a perspective on these issues. Many Christians have felt threatened by the prospect of social engagement diluting Christian distinctives. However, there are many Christians in the church, in our schools, and government who demonstrate with their lives and Christian faith that the truth of faith is contrary to idly sitting and doing nothing. Christianity is centered on the conceptual core of loving neighbor as yourself, “For I was hungry and you gave me food; I was thirsty and you gave me a drink; I was a stranger and you took me in; I was naked and you clothed me; I was sick and you visited me; I was in prison and you came to me” (Matt. 21:35-36). The me of Matthew 21 is not Ronald Hunsucker. It seems Jesus is teaching that everyone who professes Christian faith, should not believe the gospel is bifurcated from the social problems that swirl and surround His church. This edition ...
  • Looking Back: Experiences at CTS May 7, 2015 We want to thank the CTS community for a great year! Amidst the business of papers and exams, students have taken the time to both to read the Kerux, and to share their insights and articles on a variety of topics that interested them. We couldn’t have had such interesting editions if it wasn’t for the support and hard work of many students in the CTS community. For our final edition, we wanted to hear some of the stories of second or third year students. We tried especially hard to get the stories of graduates  – we thought this might be one of our last                    opportunities to really hear their voices – but didn’t factor in the many burdens seniors carry this semester: most did not have time to add an autobiographical article to their workload! However, four seniors (Elaine May, James Magee, Robin Rhodes, and Hannah Smele) were able to share pieces with us. Three of those pieces are stories of their experiences here, while a piece by Hannah Smele is a heartfelt prayer for future growth of Calvin Seminary. We ask that we listen especially closely to the voices and suggestions of those calling for needed changes, and to be a part of an ongoing conversation about how to make CTS equally welcoming and beneficial for all of our community. At the same time, let’s continue to celebrate the stories of growth, accomplishment, and joy shared as well here at CTS. Some other offerings in this edition of the Kerux: You can check out which internships students are participating this summer! Editor Robert Van Lonkhuyzen offers, in continuation with March’s theme, his journey leading to his time at CTS. Paula Seales, a first year ThM student, also shares her story and decision take on another, even more intense, degree at CTS. ...
  • Stress and Faith Formation May 7, 2015 Stress can really bring students down. Especially when there are graduation plans, paying attention to calls from churches, PhD applications, and  staying in touch with the Calvin Theological Seminary Registrars office. Yeah, that’s exciting, but stressful. What happens to the ongoing faith formation? For students who have a few more years ahead of them, we take those times of meditation on God’s word, contemplation on call, and sincere prayers of adoration for God for granted. When the hands of time get spinning too fast during our last semester, we need to remember that what we learned about faith formation is important to pastors caring for themselves. We need to exegete ourselves with the above spiritual disciplines before beginning to exegete any sermon. From the way it’s presented here at CTS, it would seem that the languages and resources are the most important. In my opinion, the spiritual disciplines are formational factors of determining who we are as missionaries, pastors, and community developers.  In the programs, business, and administration of ministry let’s not get oddly shaped into being someone who is not identifiably a servant of Jesus. Stress and faith formation are to be dealt with in a healthy way. And spiritual disciplines are part of a staying in touch with the important things in your community. There is more to the big picture of being a pastor than juggling the hats of hermeneutics. It’s being a genuine person who God can use as a servant minister. By Ronald Hunsucker
  • Kerux Editors on Diversity February 6, 2015 When we as an editing team first discussed our sense of a timely and meaningful theme for the January edition of the Kerux, diversity was a topic we kept returning to. We had some initial misgivings about the theme because of the ambiguous and misleading way in which the word is often used. The concept of diversity is a hot topic in the church; it is how churches like to describe themselves. As “proof” of diversity, churches and schools offer stats about the range of countries of origin and ethnicities and religious backgrounds represented. In itself this trend is a good thing: for much of its history, the church has reinforced class distinction and separation. We now want to do better. Yet often it doesn’t take long to scratch below the surface of that claim of diversity and notice how little people of different backgrounds and convictions are truly sharing life together. The phenomenon of lives lived apart, grouped in cliques of commonality which rigidly reject and attack difference  – even in supposedly “diverse” communities, is something our previous book of the semester, Some of My Best Friends Are Black, tried to explore, specifically in relation to the deep and painful race divisions in our country. As an editing team, we have concluded these questions are too important to avoid. The tragedies of recent events, and the diametrically opposing reactions to them in our country, have made very clear the degree of nation-wide division and misunderstanding of others’ experiences and the need to address in concrete ways the gap between the ideal of “diversity” and the realities most of us have seen and experienced. We wanted to talk less about the reality of ethnic and religious diversity at CTS, and more about the how of further uniting in Christian community. In ...
Older Articles